Congo-Brazzaville

Also known as Republic of the Congo, Congo-Brazzaville gained independence in 1960. After a quarter century of experimentation with Marxism ended in 1990, Congo-Brazzaville held democratic elections in 1992. There was a brief civil war in 1997, ending in 2003, but Congo-Brazzaville still faces unrest in the form of a humanitarian crisis presented by refugees. Congo-Brazzaville is slightly smaller than Montana; its total area is 342,000 sq km. The official language of Congo-Brazzaville is French, though Lingala and Monokutuba (lingua franca trade languages), as well as many local languages and dialects (of which Kikongo is the most widespread) are also spoken there. 50% of Congo-Brazzaville is Christian, 48% are animist, and 2% are Muslim. Natural resources of Congo-Brazzaville include petroleum, timber, potash, lead, zinc, uranium, copper, phosphates, gold, magnesium, natural gas, and hydropower. The population of Congo-Brazzaville is 4,366,266 people, and its capital is Brazzaville. It has a mixed legal system of French civil and customary law, and its national symbol is the elephant. 

  • Arun Agrawal

    Arun Agrawal

    Professor, School of Natural Resources and Environment

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    Rebecca Hardin

    Assistant Professor, Anthropology
    Assistant Professor, School of Natural Resources and Environment

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    Mbala Nkanga

    Associate Professor of Theatre and Drama, School of Music, Theatre & Dance