Jean Monnet Post-Doctoral Fellows

With support from the European Commission, the Jean Monnet Post-Doctoral Fellowship offered young scholars from Europe a three- to six-month residency at U-M in collaboration with a U-M faculty member, in order to extend U-M faculty collaborations with junior scholars affiliated with universities in the EU. During the 2008-11 grant cycle CES-EUC hosted the following fellows: Sara Binzer Hobolt, assistant professor, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford; Margitta Mätzke, lecturer, Department of Sociology, Georg-August-Universität, Göttingen; Francesc Ortega, assistant professor, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona; and H. Akin Ünver, Department of Government, International Relations, University of Essex.

SARA BINZER HOBOLT

Dr. Hobolt is University Lecturer in Comparative European Politics at the Department of Politics and International Relationsand Fellow in Politics at Lincoln College, University of Oxford. She received herB.A. in Economics, Politics, and Public Policy from University of London, Goldsmiths College (2001); M.Phil. in European Studies from the University of Cambridge, St. John’s College (2002); honorary M.A. from the University of Oxford, Nuffield College (2005); and Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Cambridge, St. John’s College (2005).

Dr. Hobolt is an associate member of Nuffield College, member of the Centre for Research Methods in the Social Sciences (ReMiSS) at Oxford, steering committee member at the ESRC Oxford Spring School, and Honorary Professor in Political Science at the University of Southern Denmark. Her research and teaching interests lie in political behavior (particularly elections and referendums), comparative politics, European integration, and quantitative methods in political science. Her book, Europe in Question: Referendums on European Integration, was published by Oxford University Press in 2009. She teaches Politics of the European Union, Comparative Government, and Politics of Europe at the undergraduate level; and teaches European Governance, Multilevel Modeling, and Research Design in Comparative Political Science at the graduate level. 

While in residence at U-M, Dr. Hobolt was associateded with the Center for Political Studies at the Institute for Social Research and worked on her postdoctoral project, "How Voters Attribute Responsibility in the European Union." She also delivered a lecture titled "Who's in Charge? How Voters Attribute Responsibility in the European Union," as part of CES-EUC's "Conversations on Europe" series. Dr. Hobolt was in residence at U-M from January 17 - April 17, 2010. 

H. AKIN ÜNVER

Dr. Ünver was born and raised in Ankara, Turkey, where he graduated from T.E.D. Ankara College in 1999. He earned his B.A. in International Relations from Bilkent University (2003) and M.Sc. in European Studies from the Middle East Technical University (2005) with his thesis "The Impact of the European Union on the Turco-Hellenic Conflict." He defended his Ph.D. dissertation, "A Comparative Analysis of the Discourses on the Kurdish Question in the European Parliament, U.S. Congress, and Turkish National Assembly" at the Department of Government, University of Essex, in December 2009. He previously assumed policy-research positions at the European Union Secretariat-General, Eurasian Center for Strategic Studies (ASAM), and the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. Dr. Ünver also held teaching positions at the Department of Government, University of Essex and the School of Arts and Social Sciences, Sabanci University. In 2009 he was a visiting scholar at U-M's Center for Middle Eastern and North African Studies (CMENAS).

While in residence at U-M, Dr. Ünver was associated with CMENAS and worked on his postdoctoral project, "Are Turkey’s pipelines European? How Turkey’s value as an energy transit country is shaping public discourse in the EU on Turkey's 'European' credentials," with Müge Goçek, associate professor of sociology. He also participated in the CES-EUC end-of-semester luncheon on the EU and Turkey, as part of CES-EUC's "Conversations on Europe" series. He was in residence at U-M from January 17 – July 17, 2010. Dr. Ünver is currently the Ertegün Lecturer of Turkish and Middle Eastern Studies, Department of Near Eastern Studies, Princeton University. His PhD dissertation titled “Defining Turkey’s Kurdish Question: Discourse in the US Congress, EU Parliament and the Turkish Grand National Assembly, 1990-99” won the 2010 Middle East Studies Association’s (MESA) Malcolm H. Kerr Award for ‘Best PhD Dissertation in Social Sciences’. For more information see http://www.akinunver.com/scholar/

MARGITTA MÄTZKE

Margitta Mätzke studied Social Sciences and Economics in Germany and received her M.A. (1999) and Ph.D. in Political Science from Northwestern University (2005). She lectures at the Sociology Department at the Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Germany. Her teaching and research interests are in the area of political sociology and comparative welfare state, especially social policy legislation in Europe and the institutional development of the German welfare state.

While in residence at U-M, Dr. Mätzke was associated with the Department of Health Management and Policy and worked on her project titled “The Europeanization of Social Policy: A Bottom-Up Perspective.” She also participated in the EUCE-MI international conference “Bacteria Without Borders: The European Governance of Communicable Disease Control,”  May 7-8, 2010 at U-M’s International Institute. She was in residence at U-M from March 3 - August 31, 2010.

FRANCESC ORTEGA 

Francesc Ortega is an assistant professor at the Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra. He received his Ph.D. in economics from New York University, M.A. in economics from the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, and B.A. in economics from the Universitat de Barcelona. His primary fields of interest are: international economics, development, and labor economics. He is a recipient of several fellowships—among them the José Castillejo Fellowship from the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation and the Juan de la Cierva Fellowship from the Spanish Ministry of Education—and  grants—most recently from the Spanish Ministry for Science and Technology. He teaches graduate courses in political economy, immigration economy, and applied economics. Currently he is working on several publications: “The Short-Run Effects of a Large Immigration Wave: Spain 1998-2008;” “The Causes and Effects of International Migrations: Evidence from OECD Countries 1980-2005” (with Giovanni Peri); and “Immigration and Housing Booms: Evidence from Spain” (with Libertad González).

During his fellowship at U-M, Dr. Ortega was associated with the Department of Economics and worked on his project titled “LaborMarket Exposure as a Determinant of Attitudes toward Immigration.” He was in residence at U-M from April 5-July 5, 2010.