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Multiple Impressions: Contemporary Woodblock Prints in China

Multiple Impressions: Contemporary Chinese Woodblock Prints

July 16–October 23, 2011

This exhibition will present works by 41 leading printmakers from contemporary China to showcase the extraordinary innovations, in both technique and conception, which have transformed this long-established art form in recent years. The exhibition will feature 115 works by such artists as Xu Bing, Kang Ning, Song Yuanwen, Chen Qi, He Kun, and Fang Limin, as well as many other accomplished printmakers. Curated by Dr. Xiaobing Tang, Helmut F. Stern Professor of Modern Chinese Studies at the University of Michigan and organized by UMMA with the assistance and cooperation of the China Academy of Art in Hangzhou, China, this exhibition—the largest examination of contemporary Chinese prints in the US since 2000—will provide an important framework for understanding both contemporary art from China and contemporary Chinese society.

1. Dai Zhengsheng Bell Rings over the Land, 2009, multi-block woodcut printed with oil-based inks, Collection of the artist. 2. Chen Qi Notations of Time No. 5, 2010, multi-block woodcut printed with water-soluble ink, Amelie Art Gallery, Beijing. 3. Liu Qingyuan Darling of the Times No. 4, 2009, woodcut printed with oil-based ink, Collection of the artist. 4. Wen Mujiang Faces No. 2 (Self-portrait), 2008, reduction woodcut printed with oil-based inks, Collection of the artist. 5. Feng Xumin Dissipated No. 6, 2007, reduction woodcut printed with oil-based inks, Collection of the artist. 6. Fang Limin Climbing, 2008, multi-block woodcut printed with water-soluble inks, Collection of the artist. 7. Shi Yi Dream of the Snowy Land, 2002, woodcut printed with oil-based ink,
Collection of the artist.

Multiple Impressions was organized by the University of Michigan Museum of Art with the cooperation and support of the China Academy of Art, Hangzhou, China. It is made possible in part by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Henry Luce Foundation, the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, and the University of Michigan Center for Chinese Studies, Confucius Institute, and Office of the Senior Vice Provost for Academic Affairs.